Labor 411 Founder and Publisher Cherri Senders weighs in on CityWatch on the Oscars controversy, but says there's one historic element people aren't talking about, and how it's still alive and well today.

By Cherri Senders

OSCAR POLITICS--If Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s legendary co-founder Louis B. Mayer (Photo above, with actress Helen Hayes) were alive today, he would likely applaud the boycott of the Oscars, but not necessarily in protest of the lack of racial diversity at Hollywood’s preeminent awards ceremony. It would be to rail against the presence of all the card-carrying members of the Teamsters, the Screen Actors Guild and numerous other unions of the film industry’s highly organized workforce.

As a fascinating 2014 Vanity Fair article reported, the Academy Awards were birthed in 1927 by Mayer and his fellow studio bosses in large part to head off labor disputes and discourage actors, directors and writers from demanding health benefits, pensions and residuals. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences would do the dirty work of keeping costs down, while throwing an annual bash to celebrate Hollywood’s biggest and brightest stars. ...

Read the full article here.

Get the latest Product Spotlights, labor blogs and more with the Labor 411 enewsletter

Buy Labor 411

Add comment


Security code
Refresh

Latest Comments

 

Subscribe

union impact

x