Ohio Governor: “We are not a ‘right to work’ state. We don’t intend to be, at least as long as I’m here.”

It is not often that I hear a Republican say no to “right to work.” But Ohio’s governor did just that recently.

WOSU reports:

“Gov. John Kasich talked about one of his favorite subjects – partnering with community colleges to develop workers’ high tech skills – as he opened the Midwestern Governors Association workforce summit Wednesday.

However, he also talked about what he says won’t be changing when it comes to Ohio’s workforce.

Eight of the 12 Midwestern states are so-called “right to work” states, which bans the requirement that workers pay union dues as a condition of employment.

Kasich, who was a key backer of the collective bargaining reform law that was repealed by voters in 2011, told attendees that Ohio won’t join their ranks.

‘We are not a ‘right to work’ state. We don’t intend to be, at least as long as I’m here,’ Kasich said. ‘But I’m only here four more months. But I didn’t see it as any kind of advantage at all. And I hope we can maintain the integrity and respect our organized labor in our state.'”

For the rest of the story, visit WOSU here.

Subscribe to the Nations largest union directory and blog site!


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Senders Communications Group, 21201 Victory Blvd. #235, Canoga Park, CA, 91303, http://www.sendersgroup.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

Featured Posts:

Amazon Will Pay Zero Dollars In Taxes On $11 Billion In Profits

If you thought Netflix paying $0 on $845 million was travesty, then Amazon's tax liability will knock your socks off ...
Read More

Union Musicians Employed On Six Of This Year’s Oscar Nominated Films

Los Angeles musicians who belong to Local 47 of the American Federation of Musicians were employed on six of the ...
Read More
The Westin

Leave a Reply