Trump’s NLRB Just Ruled To Let Corporations Off The Hook For Franchisee Labor Practices

Corporate managements just got a big win from the Trump-dominated NLRB.

NPR reports:

“McDonald’s should not be held responsible for the labor practices of its franchisees, the National Labor Relations Board ruled on Thursday.

The federal agency, in charge of enforcing U.S. labor law, delivered the latest ruling in a years-long union case that sought to hold the fast food chain liable for the treatment of all workers at both corporate and franchise locations. The agency, also known as NLRB, directed a federal administrative law judge to approve a settlement that had earlier been reached between McDonald’s, its franchisees and the workers who had alleged labor-law violations.

The case was closely watched because it had potential implications for a vast array of companies that rely on franchising and contracting for work, such as janitorial services, trucking, construction and warehousing. The NLRB ruling is expected to face an appeal.

The long and bitter litigation began in 2015, when the Service Employees International Union accused McDonald’s and its franchisees of retaliating against hundreds of workers who supported the Fight For $15 labor movement. For example, workers alleged that they were assigned harder tasks or fewer hours after they attended union-backed protests demanding higher wages.

The government’s labor-law prosecutor at the time asked the judge, Lauren Esposito, to review the complaints and consider McDonald’s a ‘joint employer’ of franchisees accused of violating labor laws.

But under a new administration, the NLRB lawyer last year abruptly proposed a settlement with the affected workers — days before the conclusion of the three-year trial. Esposito rejected the proposal, calling it ‘manifestly unreasonable’ and ‘simply baffling.’

On Thursday, an NRLB panel overruled the judge and instructed her to approve the settlement deal.

The SEIU and the Fight For $15 on Thursday called the board’s ruling on the McDonald’s case illegitimate, saying they would ‘forcefully’ appeal.”

For the rest of the story, visit NPR here.

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