UAW Asks NLRB For New Mercedes-Benz Election, Citing Illegal Union-Busting

A redo of the Mercedes-Benz vote could be happening if the NLRB agrees with the UAW.

CNBC reports:

“The United Auto Workers union is challenging the results of last week’s organizing vote of Mercedes-Benz workers in Alabama, in which workers voted against union representation, and is asking federal officials to order a new election.

Among a dozen or so claims, the Detroit union alleges that the German automaker fired four pro-union workers, forced workers to attend anti-union meetings, and interfered with workers’ ability to advocate for the union.

Union organizing failed at the Alabama plant with 56% of the vote, or 2,642 workers, casting ballots against the UAW, according to the NLRB, which oversaw the election. More than 90% of the 5,075 eligible Mercedes-Benz workers voted in the election.

‘All these workers ever wanted was a fair shot at having a voice on the job and a say in their working conditions,’ the UAW said in a statement. ‘And that’s what we’re asking for here. Let’s get a vote at Mercedes in Alabama where the company isn’t allowed to fire people, isn’t allowed to intimidate people, and isn’t allowed to break the law and their own corporate code, and let the workers decide.’

The National Labor Relations Board confirmed Friday afternoon that its Atlanta-based office received the UAW’s objections to the election. Friday was the last day the union could file objections and challenge the election.

Mercedes-Benz in a statement Friday said company officials ‘worked with the NLRB to adhere to its guidelines and we will continue to do so’ through the objection process. The automaker said it ‘sincerely hoped the UAW would respect our Team Members’ decision.’

The NLRB said its regional director will review the UAW’s allegations of an unfair election. If she finds that the objections raise substantial and material issues of fact that could be best resolved by a hearing, she will order a hearing. If after the hearing, she finds that the employer’s conduct affected the election, she can order a new election.”

For the rest of the story, visit CNBC here.

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